Emergency Online Learning: The Effects of Interactional, Motivational, Self-Regulatory, and Situational Factors on Learning Outcomes and Continuation Intentions

Keywords: emergency online learning, motivation, self-regulation, continuation intention, learning outcomes

Abstract

This study investigated the effects of interactional, motivational, self-regulatory, and situational factors on university students’ online learning outcomes and continuation intentions during the COVID-19 pandemic. Data were collected from 255 students taking a business course at a university in southern China. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses revealed that while family financial hardship caused by COVID-19 was a marginally significant negative predictor of students’ learning outcomes, learner–content interaction; instructors’ provision of e-resources, course planning, and organisation; and students’ intrinsic goal orientation and meta-cognitive self-regulation were significant positive predictors with the latter two sets of predictors mediating the effects of learner–instructor and learner–learner interactions, respectively. Multinominal logistic regression analyses showed that learner–instructor interaction, learner–content interaction, and private learning space were significant positive predictors of students’ intentions to continue with online learning, but learner–learner interaction was a significant negative predictor. These findings point to the differential effects of various types of interactional and situational factors on learning outcomes and continuation intentions, and the instructor- and learner-level factors that mediate the effects of learner–instructor and learner–learner interactions on learning outcomes. They contribute to our understandings of emergency online learning and provide implications for facilitating it.

Author Biographies

Jun Lei, Ningbo University

Dr. Jun Lei is a professor in the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Ningbo University, China. His research interests include computer-assisted language learning, English-medium instruction, online learning, and self-regulated learning. 

Teng Lin, International Business School, Guangzhou City University of Technology, China & Guangdong University of Foreign Studies, China

Dr. Teng Lin is a professor in the International Business School, Guangzhou City University of Technology, China & the School of Accounting at the Guangdong University of Foreign Studies in China. His research interests include English-medium instruction, online learning, and education in business.

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Published
2022-09-01
How to Cite
Lei, J., & Lin, T. (2022). Emergency Online Learning: The Effects of Interactional, Motivational, Self-Regulatory, and Situational Factors on Learning Outcomes and Continuation Intentions. The International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning, 23(3), 43-60. https://doi.org/10.19173/irrodl.v23i3.6078
Section
Research Articles