Alteration of Influencing Factors of Continued Intentions to Use e-Learning for Different Degrees of Adult Online Participation

  • Chi-Cheng Chang Department of Technology Application and Human Resource Development National Taiwan Normal University
Keywords: E-learning, Continued intention to use, Revised information system success model, Innovation adoption, Degree of participation

Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to investigate the alteration of influencing factors of continued intention to use e-learning for different degrees of participation of adults. Participants included 670 learners from an adult professional development website. Data was collected based on questionnaires and analyzed by Structural Equation Modeling (SEM). The Revised Information System Success Model proposed by DeLone and McLean and Innovation Adoption Theory of Rogers were adopted in the present study. A research model including two constructs (curriculum and system as well as innovation adaptation) and eight influencing factors were proposed in the present study based on features of e-learning. The results revealed that the factors in the construct of curriculum and system could be varied for different degrees of learner participation. Among those factors, system quality and online interaction were the factors for the differences between low and high groups of participation. Furthermore, the factors in the construct of innovation adaptation could be varied for different degrees of participation. Among those factors, compatibility was the factor for the differences between low and high groups of participation. Degree of online participation demonstrated moderating effects on the influences of online interaction, relative advantage and compatibility in continued intention to use.

Published
2015-11-02
How to Cite
Chang, C.-C. (2015). Alteration of Influencing Factors of Continued Intentions to Use e-Learning for Different Degrees of Adult Online Participation. The International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning, 16(4). https://doi.org/10.19173/irrodl.v16i4.2084
Section
Research Articles