Blended Learning and Sense of Community: A Comparative Analysis with Traditional and Fully Online Graduate Courses

  • Alfred P. Rovai
  • Hope Jordan

Abstract

Blended learning is a hybrid of classroom and online learning that includes some of the conveniences of online courses without the complete loss of face-to-face contact. The present study used a causal-comparative design to examine the relationship of sense of community between traditional classroom, blended, and fully online higher education learning environments. Evidence is provided to suggest that blended courses produce a stronger sense of community among students than either traditional or fully online courses.

Keywords: Blended learning, sense of community, higher education, online learning, computer-mediated communication, faculty training

Author Biographies

Alfred P. Rovai
Dr. Fred Rovai is an Assistant Professor at Regent University in Virginia. He teaches research and statistics courses at a distance for an Ed.D. program using the Blackboard.com e-learning system. He has published on classroom community in distributed leaning environments as well as online assessment theory and computer anxiety. Dr. Rovai's email address is: alfrrov@regent.edu.
Hope Jordan
Dr. Hope Jordan is an Associate Professor for the School of Education at Regent University in southeastern Virginia, USA. Dr. Jordan designed and teaches in the Hybrid Cross-Categorical Special Education Program. This program is a combination of online and in-person classes designed to meet the needs of those currently teaching on provisional licenses or those planning to go into the field of Special Education. Dr. Jordan’s email address is: hopejor@regent.edu
Published
2004-08-01
How to Cite
Rovai, A. P., & Jordan, H. (2004). Blended Learning and Sense of Community: A Comparative Analysis with Traditional and Fully Online Graduate Courses. The International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning, 5(2). https://doi.org/10.19173/irrodl.v5i2.192
Section
Research Articles