Online learner self-regulation: Learning presence viewed through quantitative content- and social network analysis

  • Peter Shea University at Albany - State University of New York
  • Suzanne Hayes Empire State College - State University of New York
  • Sedef Uzuner Smith Lamar University
  • Jason Vickers University at Albany - State University of New York
  • Temi Bidjerano Furman University
  • Mary Gozza-Cohen Widener University
  • Shou-Bang Jian University at Albany, State University of New York
  • Alexandra Pickett SUNY System Administration
  • Jane Wilde University at Albany - State University of New York
  • Chi-Hua Tseng Empire State College
Keywords: community of inquiry, learning presence, social network analysis, self-regulation, quantitative content analysis

Abstract

This paper presents an extension of an ongoing study of online learning framed within the community of inquiry (CoI) model (Garrison, Anderson, & Archer, 2001) in which we further examine a new construct labeled as learning presence. We use learning presence to refer to the iterative processes of forethought and planning, monitoring and adapting strategies for learning, and reflecting on results that successful students use to regulate their learning in online, interactive environments. To gain insight into these processes, we present results of a study using quantitative content analysis (QCA) and social network analysis (SNA) in a complementary fashion. First, we used QCA to identify the forms of learning presence reflected in students’ public (class discussions) and more private (learning journals) products of knowledge construction in online, interactive components of a graduate-level blended course. Next, we used SNA to assess how the forms of learning presence we identified through QCA correlated with the network positions students held within those interactional spaces (i.e., discussions and journals). We found that the students who demonstrated better self- and co-regulation (i.e., learning presence) took up more advantageous positions in their knowledge-generating groups. Our results extend and confirm both the CoI framework and previous investigations of online learning using SNA.

Author Biographies

Peter Shea, University at Albany - State University of New York

 Associate Professor, Educational Theory and Practice Department, School of Education 

 

Suzanne Hayes, Empire State College - State University of New York
Director of Academic Technologies, Empire State College - State University of New York;  Doctoral Candidate, University at Albany - State University of New York
Sedef Uzuner Smith, Lamar University
Assistant Professor, Counseling and Special Populations Department
Jason Vickers, University at Albany - State University of New York
Instructor, Educational Theory and Practice, School of Education
Temi Bidjerano, Furman University
Assistant Professor, Department of Education
Mary Gozza-Cohen, Widener University
Assistant Professor, Department of Education, Innovation and Continuing Studies
Shou-Bang Jian, University at Albany, State University of New York
Doctoral Student, Educational Theory and Practice
Alexandra Pickett, SUNY System Administration
Associate Director, SUNY Learning Network
Jane Wilde, University at Albany - State University of New York
Instructor, University at Albany and Marlboro College
Chi-Hua Tseng, Empire State College
Instructional Designer, Empire State College and Doctoral Students, University at Albany - State University of New York
Published
2013-07-05
How to Cite
Shea, P., Hayes, S., Uzuner Smith, S., Vickers, J., Bidjerano, T., Gozza-Cohen, M., Jian, S.-B., Pickett, A., Wilde, J., & Tseng, C.-H. (2013). Online learner self-regulation: Learning presence viewed through quantitative content- and social network analysis. The International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning, 14(3), 427-461. https://doi.org/10.19173/irrodl.v14i3.1466
Section
Research Articles