Student Dropout at the Hellenic Open University: Evaluation of the Graduate Program, "Studies in Education"

  • Dimitris Vergidis
  • Chris Panagiotakopoulos
Keywords: dropout, distance education, adults education

Abstract

This study traces the root causes of dropout rates in one post-graduate course “Studies in Education,” offered by the Hellenic Open University (HOU). From our research findings, it was found that the main cause of dropping out stem from a combination of adult learners’ obligations, specifically balancing their academic workload with their employment commitments and family obligations (mainly for female students). The second reason for dropout rates among adult distance education learners include students’ miscalculation of the available time for studying and their underestimation of the extra effort required for effective learning. These reasons can be compared to the educational material, which, in general, was not considered overly difficult and did not appear to compel students to abandon their studies.

Key terms: dropout, distance education, adults education

Author Biographies

Dimitris Vergidis
Dimitris Vergidis, Ph.D., is an associate professor at the Faculty of Primary Education – University of Patras, Greece and a member of the Board of the Hellenic Open University. Address: Professor Vergidis can be reached via email at: vergidis@upatras.gr.
Chris Panagiotakopoulos
Chris Panagiotakopoulos, Ph.D., is an assistant professor of Educational Technology at the Faculty of Primary Education – University of Patras, Greece. Chris Panagiotakopoulos is also a member of the Board of Director of the Hellenic Open University. For more information, contact Dr. Panagiotakopoulos at: cpanag@upatras.gr
Published
2002-10-01
How to Cite
Vergidis, D., & Panagiotakopoulos, C. (2002). Student Dropout at the Hellenic Open University: Evaluation of the Graduate Program, "Studies in Education". The International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning, 3(2). https://doi.org/10.19173/irrodl.v3i2.101
Section
Research Articles